Sime Darby invites public to help it protect forests via crosscheck [ 14m ago ]

FEATURES Main

Water Security The Solution To Water Woes

By Kurniawati Kamarudin

SHAH ALAM (Bernama) -- Water security is the most important aspect to consider in terms of the management of the nation's water resources in view of the threat posed by the dumping of toxic wastes into rivers.

Water is a basic necessity of human beings, hence the time has come for the government to prioritise water security, which the United Nations defines as the capacity of a population to safeguard, among others, "sustainable access to adequate quantities of acceptable quality water for sustaining livelihoods, human well-being and socio-economic development".  

According to water quality expert Dr Zaki Zainudin, when a nation has attained water security, there will be no interruptions in water supply and no dry taps for consumers even if contamination occurs as a result of illegal dumping of toxic chemicals into rivers. 

3d ago

LATEST Headlines

CORONAVIRUS: KELANTAN TIGHTENS SCREENING PROCESS AT FOUR MAJOR GATEWAYS

NO SUSPECTED CORONAVIRUS CASES REPORTED IN MELAKA, NEGERI SEMBILAN, TERENGGANU AND PAHANG

HEALTH MINISTRY WILL ENSURE HEALTHCARE 'FRONTLINERS' ARE SAFE FROM THE EXPOSURE TO THE CORONAVIRUS - DZULKEFLY

MORE News

       Recent Post

Belt and Road Legacy of Admiral Cheng Ho

By Fadzli Ramli

MELAKA (Bernama) -- Well-known 15th century mariner and explorer Admiral Cheng Ho's legacy is the game-changer that set the foundation for China's One Belt, One Road initiative, according to academics and historians.

Speaking at a seminar held in conjunction with the International Cheng Ho Festival here recently, they said the Chinese policy's roots can be traced to Cheng Ho's voyages which saw him building diplomatic relations with the countries he sailed to.

(China's Belt and Road initiative is an ambitious development strategy aimed at boosting trade and stimulating economic growth across Asia and beyond.)

Model Plane Hobbyist Flying High

By Nurfardlina Izzati Moktar

KUALA PILAH (Bernama) -- As a child, Anuar Nordin longed to play with one of those fancy remote-controlled planes he had seen on television.

But being a kampung boy, he thought his wish was merely a pie in the sky and had to contend with traditional pastimes like top spinning and shooting with catapults in his village in Johol here.

As he grew older, Anuar never gave up on his dream of flying his own remote-controlled aircraft although he put it in the back-burner when he joined the Royal Malaysian Navy in June 1987. 

       Previous Top Story